ConvertBox

convertbox featured image

Everyone hates pop-ups, but you know why companies keep using them?

…Because they work!

They increase opt-ins. They increase sales.

If you want to add popups to your site but you’re sick of huge monthly or annual bills from Sumo.com or Opt-in Monster, then ConvertBox may be for you.

ConvertBox is a pop-up monster without monthly or annual fees, but its one time price is going up after November 30th.

Check out my full walkthrough of the ConvertBox interface and see if it’s a good fit for your business.

Pros:

One of my ultimate plugins whenever I’m not working on WordPress sites. Works hand in hand with ThriveCart.

Cons:

Could improve in terms of micro control on the dashboard (but not too much in that it will add unnecessary complexity).

Price:

295

Stackable?:

No.

Where Can You Get It?:

Direct from Developer

9.3

Dave's Score

No

Community Score

ConvertBox Review & Tutorial – Limited Time Offer 2020

ConvertBox is a software-as-a-service that creates pop-ups and bars meant to increase conversions. One of the things it can do is generate those bars at the top of the screen that display countdowns or sales that are coming up.

Now this is everything that people wanted Tooltip to be – a previous AppSumo offer from a few months back. However, I’m just gonna tell you – this is not priced like an AppSumo deal, at least not without stacking.

So if you are price sensitive and expecting this to be 49 bucks, move to the next review.

However, if you like a SaaS platform that is stable, fast and essentially not a minimum viable product, this might be a good video for you.

ConvertBox is not a new platform. This has been around for a while. We actually use it and it works on any website.

Note that it’s not WordPress focused. In fact, for WordPress, I would probably use Convert Pro, a plugin from Brainstorm Force that is very similar to ConvertBox. If you’re familiar with Convert Pro, ConvertBox will seem at home.

The Lifetime Deal for ConvertBox

The deal is $295, so it’s not cheap. It has ten sites. You get 250,000 monthly active users – not a massive amount but it’s certainly not a small one either. Remember: this price is increasing on November 30, so if you want to lock it in at that cost, you need to do that pretty soon. (Update: It is $395 as of January 2020, but the price offer will also end anytime.)

deal

There is an upsell. Stack another two codes ($95 bucks) to upgrade to a pro account. A pro account brings you from 10 sites to 50 sites. So it gives you five times the number of sites and two times the number of monthly active users. That means you get 500,000 monthly active users as opposed to 250,000.

upgrade

Not cheap but also, like I said a moment ago, not a minimum viable product. You can see a lot of polish and speed to this tool.

Add a Website

I’ve got my account set up for the review, where I added one website (my thatltd.life site). You can add more websites if you click on the dropdown (at the upper left part of the Account Settings page) and find “manage my sites”. The “add site” page will show after that.

manage my sites

add site

Choose Your Integrations

The account settings page is also where you’ll set up your integrations.

One of the things that I did not like about Tooltip was the fact that it didn’t have any integrations at all. Their workaround was to embed a form from your provider on the Tooltip website. However, that seems unnecessary or not the right way to approach it.

Meanwhile, ConvertBox has integrations with the big autoresponders as well as larger ones that have done LTD’s. Some to mention are:

  • Gist
  • Platform.ly
  • Klaviyo (In my opinion, one of the best for ecommerce. I see using ConvertBox with it the most frequently, like in a Shopify or a ClickFunnels site.)
  • Demio (if you’re registering for webinars)
  • Drip
  • ConvertKit (one of my favorite email marketing platforms)
  • MailChimp

I also want to point out that we can link up to Google Analytics, which lets us track the data from website activities.

We can also put a custom HTML form. So if you’re using something like Sendy or Mautic, you can include a custom HTML form in ConvertBox. This isn’t what Tooltip did. It is the ability to integrate with a form, utilize ConvertBox’s form building, and have that information piped into your email autoresponder’s form. It is something that ThriveCart does as well and it works perfectly with Mautic.

So, a really great option here. I think ResponseSuite (a survey software on AppSumo) also has that type of integration. I wish more companies could do that.

Organize Your Convert Boxes

Heading over to the dashboard, let’s figure out how this platform works. We’re going to start with the “groups”. (This is instead of the “new ConvertBox” option where they’re pointing.)

add group

A group is like a folder (if we compare it to a computer’s file system). Inside that folder, we can put different popups, hello bars, or any other type of convert boxes that we can build. You put those into the group and they can all share a common goal.

group goal

While obviously a group keeps things organized, there are other things you can do. Let’s say your goal was to get someone on your email list. You might have several popups that have different offers (e.g. download an ebook, view a video, etc.). Those popups could all have different lead magnets but have the same common goal of getting someone to subscribe.

When individuals subscribe, you don’t necessarily want to continue showing them more of those popups, right? So again you group them together and set up a group goal.

With that, you have two options. One is to set a goal inside of each of the convert boxes. So if they have different Thank You pages, you do that. Then you’d say if any of the convert boxes met its goal, don’t show any convert boxes in this group again.

Or if they all go to the same landing page, you can choose the “visited a specific webpage” from the dropdown. Below I’ve entered my fake Thank You page url. When they land on that Thank You page, the convert boxes are supposed to stop showing.

group goal

In the video, I created a group called “Demo”. Next thing to do was put a popup inside of it by clicking the “new ConvertBox” option. The following page will then show:

create a new convertbox

Create a Convert Box

There are four different types of pop-ups that we can make with ConvertBox:

select a type of convertbox

Sticky Bar – It is ConvertBox’s version of a hello bar. (Fyi, Hello Bar is an established company in itself.)

Callout Modal – Modal callouts are like little chat bubbles that show up. You can’t actually chat in them but they look like chat bubbles.

Center Modal – The kind of standard popup that comes in the middle of the screen.

Full Page – This is a full-page popup. I remember AppSumo used to have a full-page popup all the time. Every time you visit their site, it appears, and you need to scroll to get out of it. So expect something like that.

Customize the Pop-Up

Let’s look at how the builder works.

In the video, I used the Center Modal format. Currently, there are nine templates to choose from. They have templates that fit just about every style and you can customize those further. But you can also start from a blank canvas if you don’t like any of those templates.

In the demo, I explored the template called segmentation, which is the one below:

page builder

If you’ve ever seen Convert Pro, ConvertBox will look familiar, while the color scheme is a bit different. We’ve got our widgets at the left part of the page. At the top is where you’ll find the Customize (the page builder we’re in), Display, Targeting, and Goals tabs.

You can switch between a desktop and a mobile view. You can also spot here the Create A/B Test button, a feature which you don’t see inside of Convert Pro.

The Builder’s Widgets

Image

Here, you can upload and resize an image as you need.

But one limitation is in moving the image. I don’t have the ability to set a padding or a margin. I can’t place the image in some pixel perfect way. If you need something more exact, Convert Pro lets you do that. As for ConvertBox, it’s more of choosing any of the left, right, or center options in terms of image alignment.

Button

For buttons, you have selections such as size (small, medium, and large), width (slim, regular, and wide), and button shape (square, rounded, and round).

button editor

There are no extremely precise CSS controls – just some presets. I will say that I like the presets, making the popups very fast to work on.

To me, popups don’t have to precisely match the overall aesthetic of the website. You might have to color coordinate but it doesn’t have to be the most beautiful thing ever. You don’t have to spend a lot of time for this other than for grabbing people’s attention. I’m not trying to despair either – the popups look good. I don’t need all that customization I guess.

Text

There’s the text widget. There are 12 different fonts you can choose from. You can specify the text color, font size, and line height. More basic editing selections show as you click on a text (bold, underline, italics, alignment, and linking).

Video

You can drag and drop a video. It will ask for your video’s embed code. Options here include video size, “show video as full width banner” (shown below), and hide video on mobile devices (probably not as necessary as when bandwidth was an issue five years back).

drag video

Speaking of the hide feature, there is also an option for that when it comes to an image. So if you have one that isn’t styled appropriately or just takes up too much of the page, you can easily turn that off on mobile.

Timer

We can add in a timer for scarcity. We can either make it evergreen (resets for every person that hits the page) or have a fixed date (a bit more genuine – puts a deadline date for the offer).

HTML

You can also grab an HTML widget if you want to put a custom code in your convert box.

Do a Split Test

Creating a split test is super easy. It takes about five seconds to generate a variation. To do that, hit the button for the split test to reveal its dropdown. From here, you can produce “variations” for the split test (copying the current version of the draft you’re working on).

(Note: Make sure that you only create variations for a split test after you’ve completed the set up of your first variant. That includes the action steps for buttons to function, to be discussed below. Otherwise, you’ll encounter issues in installing the box on your website, as mentioned on 21:15 of the video.)

Let’s say you created two variants. With that, you can switch pages from one variant to the next, as you access their editor interface. You may choose to focus on a certain element of your convert box. For example, each variant can have a different headline for you to test on.

But that’s not to say it’s as full featured as I’d like. There’s no way to weigh one or the other. Often, if you’re using Google Optimize or the other split testing tools, they’d have the ability to do something like show variant A – 80% of the time, while show variant B – 20% of the time.

Then you’d consider the conversion rate. It’s not necessarily how many persons each converted but the percentage that each converted so you can make a judgement.

So you might say A is probably better – let’s show it most of the time. But we do want to test something else so we’ll kind of mix it. That’s how I like to do AB testing – have a heavily favored one that we think is going to be the winner and then make a small change.

Now there are more options you can find under settings for variants. You can choose your split test type to be either a “cookie split test” or a “regular split” test.

split test

A cookie split test will always show the same variant to a site visitor. So if I visit your website and you’ve got a split test running, I’m always going to see the same popup every time I go there. Meanwhile, someone else might be seeing a different one. If I clear the cookies in my computer, then there’s always the possibility that I see a different popup at that point. That’s mostly the thought process here.

Configuring “Steps”

Let’s go over to steps. This part is kind of exciting.

steps section

Here, we can create a different second step for each button to be clicked.

For example, if our popup has three buttons that need to perform different actions, we can set that up here.

First, you need to click on a specific button in your popup to open up its editor:

edit button

Here, the button action field lets you choose any of the following: open another step, link to a webpage, and close the ConvertBox.

If I select “open another step”, then I’d need to realize that other step. This is where the prompt “start creating steps” in the Steps section makes sense. (I pressed back to exit the button’s editor and went to the Steps section.)

Upon choosing to create steps, the following will appear:

steps

As you can see, you can build/edit a page for each corresponding step.

You can still access ConvertBox’s usual widgets for a page builder, if you click again the Elements section.

In my video’s example, I chose to drag the form widget. My form could have fields like name, email address, phone number, etc. I could also connect that form up to an autoresponder. So when someone submits,
it gets signed up as a lead.

After that, I could add yet another step for the website visitor, go to a page on my website, or probably just close a convert box in most situations.

step

There are also options here to customize colors and change the fonts just like we saw before.

Going Back to the Main Button Editor

Now that the steps are set up, we can go back to our button editor. If the button action is set to “open another step”, another dropdown will show below it, where you’ll pick a specific step among those you’ve set up earlier.

For example, in the following, the second button (“I need more information”) is assigned with Step 2 that we’ve created in the Steps sections.

button

Check the Mobile View

You can make further adjustments when it comes to mobile view. For example, I’ve modified the image’s size as shown below:

edit image

Publish the Convert Box

After working on the convert box, it’s time to publish it. From the Customize section, we go to the Display section.

Display section

display section

We’d need to set a trigger that determines when the ConvertBox is supposed to show:

trigger

You can also set the number of times that someone sees the same popup:

 duration

duration

If you choose to limit the views, there are further settings you can do such as put the number of views within a timeframe. Meanwhile, you can opt for unlimited views, which I did in the video because we’re testing it on a live site.

You can also set the location:

location

If the popup needs to be on specific pages, there are also prompts for that:

location

Targeting section

Alright, let’s go to the next section which is on targeting. I can decide whether to show this to everybody who comes to my site or target certain people based on some rules.

target

The following are the visitor rules you can select:

visitor rule

  • Number of visits – display the convert box only to people who visited for a number of times or more.
  • Device type – only to people on either desktop or mobile.
  • URL string keyword – only to those with a particular string in their URL.

url string

  • Referring website – only to those who clicked a link from a certain website.
  • Visitors location – target or exclude people based on location.
  • Visited page – tag those who already visited a page for more targeting. For example, we can show them another popup or a similar content.
  • Seen ConvertBox – tag those who have seen a certain convert box, again, for more targeting (e.g. showcase a better offer of a product).
  • Autoresponder activity – tag people based on their activities in your autoresponder setup.

So those are the basic ideas behind these rules. Obviously, there are a lot that we can do with ConvertBox from the rules laid here.

Goals section

Over on Goals, that is where we set up our goal for the convert box we created.

goals

At the beginning of our demo, we put our convert box in a group (folder). We gave that group the goal of hitting a Thank You page.

Note also that if I wanted to, I could have a separate goal for each convert box within a group. Then when any of those goals are hit, I can set the entire group to eventually not show anymore.

Install the Convert Box

The last step would be to install the convert box on your site.

After confirming the convert box’s activation, you’ll arrive at this page:

install

You basically have two ways of getting this on your side (although it looks like three). You can put this through their WordPress plugin if you’re using WordPress. Or you can install the script just before the closing tag on your website’s pages:

add script

The third option is just to email someone else the directions so that they can do it for you.

Our Sample

The following is the output of our demo creation of a convert box. As you can see, we are able to make a popup with three buttons. Clicking on a button will take me to that button’s next step (like display a form or a picture).

pop-up

So you can see how easy it is to start different offers based on how someone reacts to buttons. You could build out an entire sales funnel really just inside of ConvertBox. It’s pretty powerful for what it’s capable of.

View the Dashboard

Heading over to the dashboard, you can see the number of views and leads, as well as the conversion rate shown next to the convert box.

The mark A/B signifies a convert box has a split test going on.

dashboard

Statistics page

If I click the Stats button of a certain convert box, it will take me to another page showing more statistical information:

 statistics

I can get stats on a split test where maybe I could pick a winner. For example, below shows that variant A was displayed 10 times while variant B was displayed four times. A had a 142.86% interaction rate while B had 100%.

test variations

I can view either a specific group or all groups. I can also choose to see all the convert boxes for that group or just one convert box. So you can really drill down on how things are performing.

group

We can see things over a specific time period. You get the last seven days, last 30 days, yesterday, today or you can just set a custom period by using the date picker.

time period

If you notice, everything is really snappy here. Some sites take time to load when you click something. That won’t be the case if you have proper allocated servers with enough resources to manage the site. ConvertBox is definitely not skimping on the server resources, so I appreciate that.

More Features

You have other features here to manage a convert box. At the Stats section, you can find options to edit, rename, or delete a convert box. You can clone as well as move a convert box to a different site.

If you’re doing some testing, you can also reset the stats.

edit convertbox

You can also move the convert box to a different site. This means changing the site url (and other settings) that this convert box is supposed to go. For example, I can clone a popup that has been effective, then move the clones to my other clients’ respective sites.

ConvertBox Final Thoughts & Rating

ConvertBox is a really great plugin (fanboy mode on). It goes hand in hand with ThriveCart whenever I’m not using WordPress. If anyone watches this channel, you know that I use mostly WordPress.

But when I don’t, I get to use these other cool toys like ConvertBox and ThriveCart. Those are both amazing platforms that have a lot going for them. So if you are working on websites that are not WordPress based, these two tools are probably going to be handy in your tool belt.

Rating: A very solid 9.3.

I think it could improve when it comes to micro control on the dashboard for those who need it. But not too much because I feel it would add complexity that’s not necessary.

I recommend ConvertBox wholeheartedly – no apprehensions saying that.

ConvertBox Review & Tutorial – Limited Time Offer 2020

ConvertBox is a software-as-a-service that creates pop-ups and bars meant to increase conversions. One of the things it can do is generate those bars at the top of the screen that display countdowns or sales that are coming up. Now this is everything that people wanted Tooltip to be – a previous AppSumo offer from a few months back. However, I’m just gonna tell you – this is not priced like an AppSumo deal, at least not without stacking. So if you are price sensitive and expecting this to be 49 bucks, move to the next review. However, if you like a SaaS platform that is stable, fast and essentially not a minimum viable product, this might be a good video for you. ConvertBox is not a new platform. This has been around for a while. We actually use it and it works on any website. Note that it’s not WordPress focused. In fact, for WordPress, I would probably use Convert Pro, a plugin from Brainstorm Force that is very similar to ConvertBox. If you’re familiar with Convert Pro, ConvertBox will seem at home.

The Lifetime Deal for ConvertBox

The deal is $295, so it’s not cheap. It has ten sites. You get 250,000 monthly active users – not a massive amount but it’s certainly not a small one either. Remember: this price is increasing on November 30, so if you want to lock it in at that cost, you need to do that pretty soon. (Update: It is $395 as of January 2020, but the price offer will also end anytime.) deal There is an upsell. Stack another two codes ($95 bucks) to upgrade to a pro account. A pro account brings you from 10 sites to 50 sites. So it gives you five times the number of sites and two times the number of monthly active users. That means you get 500,000 monthly active users as opposed to 250,000. upgrade Not cheap but also, like I said a moment ago, not a minimum viable product. You can see a lot of polish and speed to this tool.

Add a Website

I’ve got my account set up for the review, where I added one website (my thatltd.life site). You can add more websites if you click on the dropdown (at the upper left part of the Account Settings page) and find “manage my sites”. The “add site” page will show after that. manage my sites add site

Choose Your Integrations

The account settings page is also where you’ll set up your integrations. One of the things that I did not like about Tooltip was the fact that it didn’t have any integrations at all. Their workaround was to embed a form from your provider on the Tooltip website. However, that seems unnecessary or not the right way to approach it. Meanwhile, ConvertBox has integrations with the big autoresponders as well as larger ones that have done LTD’s. Some to mention are:
  • Gist
  • Platform.ly
  • Klaviyo (In my opinion, one of the best for ecommerce. I see using ConvertBox with it the most frequently, like in a Shopify or a ClickFunnels site.)
  • Demio (if you’re registering for webinars)
  • Drip
  • ConvertKit (one of my favorite email marketing platforms)
  • MailChimp
I also want to point out that we can link up to Google Analytics, which lets us track the data from website activities. We can also put a custom HTML form. So if you’re using something like Sendy or Mautic, you can include a custom HTML form in ConvertBox. This isn’t what Tooltip did. It is the ability to integrate with a form, utilize ConvertBox’s form building, and have that information piped into your email autoresponder’s form. It is something that ThriveCart does as well and it works perfectly with Mautic. So, a really great option here. I think ResponseSuite (a survey software on AppSumo) also has that type of integration. I wish more companies could do that.

Organize Your Convert Boxes

Heading over to the dashboard, let’s figure out how this platform works. We’re going to start with the “groups”. (This is instead of the “new ConvertBox” option where they’re pointing.) add group A group is like a folder (if we compare it to a computer’s file system). Inside that folder, we can put different popups, hello bars, or any other type of convert boxes that we can build. You put those into the group and they can all share a common goal. group goal While obviously a group keeps things organized, there are other things you can do. Let’s say your goal was to get someone on your email list. You might have several popups that have different offers (e.g. download an ebook, view a video, etc.). Those popups could all have different lead magnets but have the same common goal of getting someone to subscribe. When individuals subscribe, you don’t necessarily want to continue showing them more of those popups, right? So again you group them together and set up a group goal. With that, you have two options. One is to set a goal inside of each of the convert boxes. So if they have different Thank You pages, you do that. Then you’d say if any of the convert boxes met its goal, don’t show any convert boxes in this group again. Or if they all go to the same landing page, you can choose the “visited a specific webpage” from the dropdown. Below I’ve entered my fake Thank You page url. When they land on that Thank You page, the convert boxes are supposed to stop showing. group goal In the video, I created a group called “Demo”. Next thing to do was put a popup inside of it by clicking the “new ConvertBox” option. The following page will then show: create a new convertbox

Create a Convert Box

There are four different types of pop-ups that we can make with ConvertBox: select a type of convertbox Sticky Bar – It is ConvertBox’s version of a hello bar. (Fyi, Hello Bar is an established company in itself.) Callout Modal – Modal callouts are like little chat bubbles that show up. You can’t actually chat in them but they look like chat bubbles. Center Modal – The kind of standard popup that comes in the middle of the screen. Full Page – This is a full-page popup. I remember AppSumo used to have a full-page popup all the time. Every time you visit their site, it appears, and you need to scroll to get out of it. So expect something like that.

Customize the Pop-Up

Let’s look at how the builder works. In the video, I used the Center Modal format. Currently, there are nine templates to choose from. They have templates that fit just about every style and you can customize those further. But you can also start from a blank canvas if you don’t like any of those templates. In the demo, I explored the template called segmentation, which is the one below: page builder If you’ve ever seen Convert Pro, ConvertBox will look familiar, while the color scheme is a bit different. We’ve got our widgets at the left part of the page. At the top is where you’ll find the Customize (the page builder we’re in), Display, Targeting, and Goals tabs. You can switch between a desktop and a mobile view. You can also spot here the Create A/B Test button, a feature which you don’t see inside of Convert Pro.

The Builder’s Widgets

Image Here, you can upload and resize an image as you need. But one limitation is in moving the image. I don’t have the ability to set a padding or a margin. I can’t place the image in some pixel perfect way. If you need something more exact, Convert Pro lets you do that. As for ConvertBox, it’s more of choosing any of the left, right, or center options in terms of image alignment. Button For buttons, you have selections such as size (small, medium, and large), width (slim, regular, and wide), and button shape (square, rounded, and round). button editor There are no extremely precise CSS controls – just some presets. I will say that I like the presets, making the popups very fast to work on. To me, popups don’t have to precisely match the overall aesthetic of the website. You might have to color coordinate but it doesn’t have to be the most beautiful thing ever. You don’t have to spend a lot of time for this other than for grabbing people’s attention. I’m not trying to despair either – the popups look good. I don’t need all that customization I guess. Text There’s the text widget. There are 12 different fonts you can choose from. You can specify the text color, font size, and line height. More basic editing selections show as you click on a text (bold, underline, italics, alignment, and linking). Video You can drag and drop a video. It will ask for your video’s embed code. Options here include video size, “show video as full width banner” (shown below), and hide video on mobile devices (probably not as necessary as when bandwidth was an issue five years back). drag video Speaking of the hide feature, there is also an option for that when it comes to an image. So if you have one that isn’t styled appropriately or just takes up too much of the page, you can easily turn that off on mobile. Timer We can add in a timer for scarcity. We can either make it evergreen (resets for every person that hits the page) or have a fixed date (a bit more genuine – puts a deadline date for the offer). HTML You can also grab an HTML widget if you want to put a custom code in your convert box.

Do a Split Test

Creating a split test is super easy. It takes about five seconds to generate a variation. To do that, hit the button for the split test to reveal its dropdown. From here, you can produce “variations” for the split test (copying the current version of the draft you’re working on). (Note: Make sure that you only create variations for a split test after you’ve completed the set up of your first variant. That includes the action steps for buttons to function, to be discussed below. Otherwise, you’ll encounter issues in installing the box on your website, as mentioned on 21:15 of the video.) Let’s say you created two variants. With that, you can switch pages from one variant to the next, as you access their editor interface. You may choose to focus on a certain element of your convert box. For example, each variant can have a different headline for you to test on. But that’s not to say it’s as full featured as I’d like. There’s no way to weigh one or the other. Often, if you’re using Google Optimize or the other split testing tools, they’d have the ability to do something like show variant A – 80% of the time, while show variant B – 20% of the time. Then you’d consider the conversion rate. It’s not necessarily how many persons each converted but the percentage that each converted so you can make a judgement. So you might say A is probably better – let’s show it most of the time. But we do want to test something else so we’ll kind of mix it. That’s how I like to do AB testing – have a heavily favored one that we think is going to be the winner and then make a small change. Now there are more options you can find under settings for variants. You can choose your split test type to be either a “cookie split test” or a “regular split” test. split test A cookie split test will always show the same variant to a site visitor. So if I visit your website and you’ve got a split test running, I’m always going to see the same popup every time I go there. Meanwhile, someone else might be seeing a different one. If I clear the cookies in my computer, then there’s always the possibility that I see a different popup at that point. That’s mostly the thought process here.

Configuring “Steps”

Let’s go over to steps. This part is kind of exciting. steps section Here, we can create a different second step for each button to be clicked. For example, if our popup has three buttons that need to perform different actions, we can set that up here. First, you need to click on a specific button in your popup to open up its editor: edit button Here, the button action field lets you choose any of the following: open another step, link to a webpage, and close the ConvertBox. If I select “open another step”, then I’d need to realize that other step. This is where the prompt “start creating steps” in the Steps section makes sense. (I pressed back to exit the button’s editor and went to the Steps section.) Upon choosing to create steps, the following will appear: steps As you can see, you can build/edit a page for each corresponding step. You can still access ConvertBox’s usual widgets for a page builder, if you click again the Elements section. In my video’s example, I chose to drag the form widget. My form could have fields like name, email address, phone number, etc. I could also connect that form up to an autoresponder. So when someone submits, it gets signed up as a lead. After that, I could add yet another step for the website visitor, go to a page on my website, or probably just close a convert box in most situations. step There are also options here to customize colors and change the fonts just like we saw before. Going Back to the Main Button Editor Now that the steps are set up, we can go back to our button editor. If the button action is set to “open another step”, another dropdown will show below it, where you’ll pick a specific step among those you’ve set up earlier. For example, in the following, the second button (“I need more information”) is assigned with Step 2 that we’ve created in the Steps sections. button

Check the Mobile View

You can make further adjustments when it comes to mobile view. For example, I’ve modified the image’s size as shown below: edit image

Publish the Convert Box

After working on the convert box, it’s time to publish it. From the Customize section, we go to the Display section.

Display section

display section We’d need to set a trigger that determines when the ConvertBox is supposed to show: trigger You can also set the number of times that someone sees the same popup:  duration duration If you choose to limit the views, there are further settings you can do such as put the number of views within a timeframe. Meanwhile, you can opt for unlimited views, which I did in the video because we’re testing it on a live site. You can also set the location: location If the popup needs to be on specific pages, there are also prompts for that: location

Targeting section

Alright, let’s go to the next section which is on targeting. I can decide whether to show this to everybody who comes to my site or target certain people based on some rules. target The following are the visitor rules you can select: visitor rule
  • Number of visits – display the convert box only to people who visited for a number of times or more.
  • Device type – only to people on either desktop or mobile.
  • URL string keyword – only to those with a particular string in their URL.
url string
  • Referring website – only to those who clicked a link from a certain website.
  • Visitors location – target or exclude people based on location.
  • Visited page – tag those who already visited a page for more targeting. For example, we can show them another popup or a similar content.
  • Seen ConvertBox – tag those who have seen a certain convert box, again, for more targeting (e.g. showcase a better offer of a product).
  • Autoresponder activity – tag people based on their activities in your autoresponder setup.
So those are the basic ideas behind these rules. Obviously, there are a lot that we can do with ConvertBox from the rules laid here.

Goals section

Over on Goals, that is where we set up our goal for the convert box we created. goals At the beginning of our demo, we put our convert box in a group (folder). We gave that group the goal of hitting a Thank You page. Note also that if I wanted to, I could have a separate goal for each convert box within a group. Then when any of those goals are hit, I can set the entire group to eventually not show anymore.

Install the Convert Box

The last step would be to install the convert box on your site. After confirming the convert box’s activation, you’ll arrive at this page: install You basically have two ways of getting this on your side (although it looks like three). You can put this through their WordPress plugin if you’re using WordPress. Or you can install the script just before the closing tag on your website’s pages: add script The third option is just to email someone else the directions so that they can do it for you.

Our Sample

The following is the output of our demo creation of a convert box. As you can see, we are able to make a popup with three buttons. Clicking on a button will take me to that button’s next step (like display a form or a picture). pop-up So you can see how easy it is to start different offers based on how someone reacts to buttons. You could build out an entire sales funnel really just inside of ConvertBox. It’s pretty powerful for what it’s capable of.

View the Dashboard

Heading over to the dashboard, you can see the number of views and leads, as well as the conversion rate shown next to the convert box. The mark A/B signifies a convert box has a split test going on. dashboard

Statistics page

If I click the Stats button of a certain convert box, it will take me to another page showing more statistical information:  statistics I can get stats on a split test where maybe I could pick a winner. For example, below shows that variant A was displayed 10 times while variant B was displayed four times. A had a 142.86% interaction rate while B had 100%. test variations I can view either a specific group or all groups. I can also choose to see all the convert boxes for that group or just one convert box. So you can really drill down on how things are performing. group We can see things over a specific time period. You get the last seven days, last 30 days, yesterday, today or you can just set a custom period by using the date picker. time period If you notice, everything is really snappy here. Some sites take time to load when you click something. That won’t be the case if you have proper allocated servers with enough resources to manage the site. ConvertBox is definitely not skimping on the server resources, so I appreciate that.

More Features

You have other features here to manage a convert box. At the Stats section, you can find options to edit, rename, or delete a convert box. You can clone as well as move a convert box to a different site. If you’re doing some testing, you can also reset the stats. edit convertbox You can also move the convert box to a different site. This means changing the site url (and other settings) that this convert box is supposed to go. For example, I can clone a popup that has been effective, then move the clones to my other clients’ respective sites.

ConvertBox Final Thoughts & Rating

ConvertBox is a really great plugin (fanboy mode on). It goes hand in hand with ThriveCart whenever I’m not using WordPress. If anyone watches this channel, you know that I use mostly WordPress. But when I don’t, I get to use these other cool toys like ConvertBox and ThriveCart. Those are both amazing platforms that have a lot going for them. So if you are working on websites that are not WordPress based, these two tools are probably going to be handy in your tool belt. Rating: A very solid 9.3. I think it could improve when it comes to micro control on the dashboard for those who need it. But not too much because I feel it would add complexity that’s not necessary. I recommend ConvertBox wholeheartedly – no apprehensions saying that.

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